16 November 2012

Growth Patterns of Javanese and Cape Coloured Children: Anthropometric Study in Well-off Children

Posted by Mirth under: antropologi ragawi; growth study / tumbuh kembang; social biology / biologi sosial .

For  full text, click on: javanese-children-compared-to-south-african_fk-uht.pdf

How to cite this article:

Artaria, Myrtati Dyah (2009)  Growth Patterns of Javanese and Cape Coloured Children: Anthropometric Study in Well-off Children. Medical Journal of Universitas Hang Tuah Vol. 7(2).

ABSTRACT

Growing children in certain populations are not always following the same pattern as children in other populations. The purpose of this research is to prove that children from good socio-economic conditions growing in two clearly distinct populations may  not have similar patterns of growth. A total of 1691 children (737 boys and 954 girls) middle to upper socioeconomic status, aged 6 to 19 years, were measured during the study. The variables measured were body height, weight, trunk length, upper limb length, lower limb length, humerus biepicondylar breadth, subscapular and abdominal skinfold thicknesses. Javanese schoolchildren’s anthropometric measurements were compared to those of Cape Coloured. The averages of most length measurements for Javanese schoolchildren were closer to those for urban Cape Coloured children in the early years, and became closer to those for rural Cape Coloured children in the later years. This is not likely to mean that the younger Javanese children lived in a better environment, had better health care, or were generally richer than the older children. General conditions have not changed much in 17 years in Malang, up to the time of this measurement. Those two facts simply mean that Javanese schoolchildren follow a different pattern of growth from Cape Coloured children and those children measured to create the NHANES growth reference. This confirms that Javanese schoolchildren have different size and shape which cannot be explained simply by their having a lower quality of environment and nutrition. There must be a strong genetic influence in the regulation of their size and shape.

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